Why Are Suboxone Doctors so Hard to Find?

The demand for Suboxone doctors has increased exponentially in light of the opiate epidemic that’s swept the country within the past decade. People recovering chronic opiate addiction problems often contend with persistent withdrawal effects and severe drug cravings long after they stop abusing drugs. Suboxone’s effects go a long way towards helping a person better manage addiction’s aftereffects.

In spite of the high demand for Suboxone doctors, many in recovery have problems finding needed treatment help. Unfortunately, outside factors have created barriers that limit availability and access to Suboxone doctors.

The Benefits of Suboxone Treatment

Suboxone treatment works in much the same way as methadone in terms of its ability to mimic the effects of addictive opiates.

According to the Centers of Medicare & Medicaid Services, Suboxone differs in that it carries a lower abuse/addiction potential, which accounts for why Suboxone doctors can administer the drug on an out-of-office basis.

In effect, Suboxone treatment produces a two-fold effect by reducing the degree of withdrawal and cravings effects experienced while also incorporating a preventative mechanism that discourages relapse events.

Not sure if your insurance will help cover your treatment costs? Call our helpline at 800-533-1341 for more information.

Why Suboxone Doctors are so Hard to Find

Limits on the Number of Patients Suboxone Doctors Can Have

Federal laws place limits on the number of patients Suboxone doctors can have. Currently, Suboxone doctors can treat no more than 100 patients at any one time. The reason for this limit has to do with the range of problems recovering opiate addicts have as chronic opiate abuse can cause both medical and psychological problems to develop during the course of drug use. Subsequently, these types of patients require more frequents office visits and take up more time in treatment.

High Costs Coupled with Limited Insurance Coverage

The high demand for Suboxone treatment coupled with the short supply of Suboxone doctors has driven treatment costs up considerably. Insurance company coverages are also lacking in terms of restrictions placed on dosage amounts, number of visits per patient, and coverage amounts per office visit. Many doctors who dispense this drug only take cash as a result.

Suboxone Treatment in a Doctor’s Office: How Does It Work?

Licensing Requirements

Suboxone doctors must receive formal training from the Drug Enforcement Administration before they can administer the drug. In effect, the vast majority of physicians in the United States are not licensed to prescribe Suboxone. Also, not all eligible providers are listed on existing government directories, which can make it difficult to find a Suboxone doctor in your area.

Diversion Practices

According to the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, current prescription guidelines for Suboxone allow for a maximum daily dose of 32 milligrams per day.

In actuality, the average daily dosage amount needed typically runs no higher than 16 milligrams. Since patients can take home weekly or monthly supplies of the drug, it’s not uncommon for excess doses to be sold on the streets. In effect, ongoing attempts to reduce diversion practices have resulted in tighter restrictions that limit access to Suboxone doctors.

If you or someone you know are having trouble locating a Suboxone doctor and need help, please feel free to call our toll-free helpline at 800-533-1341 to speak with one of our addictions specialists.